Age is Just a Number

Age is Just a Number

Premier’s own Jean Cherni was featured on the cover of the March 2017 issue of The Breeze.  A regional magazine from her adopted hometown in Connecticut. We invite you to learn more about her varied career and experiences, and how she came to join the senior services industry.

Jean Cherni: Proving Age is Just a Number

Credits: The Breeze Magazine. Article by Jessica Spinelli. Photography by: William Canosa

Throughout Jean Cherni’s 88 years of life, one constant has re-occurred throughout her many travels and opportunities; other women have often been responsible for helping her to realize many of her goals.

Jean grew up in New York and Long Island in an era when most women were focused on becoming wives and mothers; she attended the University of Iowa, receiving  a B.A. in political science. After graduation, she moved back to New York City, only to find that the glass ceiling was very real. Every interview would end with, “That’s nice, honey, but can you type?” It was during this time that a woman helped her get her first break.

The summer after graduation, Jean read an article about Barbizon lingerie, a fashion manufacturer with an elegant showroom located on 5th Avenue. Jean’s mother was a talented dressmaker, so she loved fashion, and decided  to see if she could get a position as a receptionist at the showroom. Without an appointment, she walked in off the street and asked to see someone about  employment.

Jean was sent to see Erleen Griffith. Midway through her interview, her answers so impressed Erleen that Jean was  asked which agency had sent her. It turned out that they were looking for a fashion stylist to do department store promotions in New England and had placed a request with an employment agency. Even though she had to tell Erleen she had not come through an agency, Erleen felt she was ideal for the position and offered it to her on the spot.  However, she had to  convince two male vice presidents to give Jean a try despite their
objections that she was too young and inexperienced.

For several years, Jean worked as a fashion stylist, doing department store promotions throughout New England. Eventually, she tired of living out of a suitcase. Looking for work in New York, she met two women who had a small public relations agency and she was hired to work as a fashion copywriter. She wrote P.R. releases, captions on fashion photographs and accessorized outfits for fashion shoots. During this time she met Val, the man who would become her husband.

After they were married, Val was given an offer at an engineering firm in Chicago. Jean wasn’t happy to leave her job, especially since the work she’d been doing simply didn’t exist in the Windy City. “I went to an agency there and was told, “We don’t have anything in fashion. Could you write about farm equipment?” Jean declined, but had made friends with the head of the agency (a woman) who offered her a position as an employment counselor.

During this time, her first son, Michael, was born, and less than two years later, pregnant with their second child, Val received an offer from a New York engineering company to work on the design and construction of Japan’s first nuclear power plant. Although she was eight months pregnant and in a new home they’d recently purchased, much to her husband’s surprise, Jean didn’t hesitate but encouraged Val to accept the offer. Once again, with two small children in tow, the family moved; only this time it was to a small, rural village across the world.

The four years she spent in Japan were an intense learning experience. It wasn’t long after World War II had ended and she found herself, understandably, not particularly welcome. She taught Michael through a correspondence course while Steve would often come home crying because the local children had been teasing him and pulling his hair; not believing that his blonde hair was real. There was an entirely new culture to learn and Jean found herself quite lost until she learned how to speak Japanese.

Eventually, she began doing some articles for a new, small magazine, created for the just-beginning tourist industry. Accompanied by a Japanese photographer, it offered a chance to visit many interesting areas.

After another move in Japan, the family moved back to New York City. Jean soon learned that the local schools had changed, so the family bought a home in Port Washington, Long Island. Never one to stay home, Jean decided to go into local real estate and again, it was a woman who was the head of the agency who hired and mentored her. During this time, she had an unexpected late-life child: a longed for daughter,
Marianne.

Tired of selling houses after 20 years and having trained many other agents, Jean took a position as a regional trainer for Century 21. Hired, once again, by a woman, she was told that the position required a move to Connecticut. Jean discussed it with Val, who at 65 had just retired
(a requirement at his company). He agreed it was a good idea.

After renting a room to try out the job for six months, Jean commuted back and forth to Long Island every weekend when her husband unexpectedly balked at selling the house and moving to Connecticut. He was not adjusting well to the inactivity that retirement brought. Jean was understandably upset. She wasn’tgoing to quit her job, so she commuted every weekend for almost two years, until Val finally sought therapy and was then able to make the move. It was the most difficult period of their marriage but ended well when Val, realizing he still wanted to work, moved and then found employment with a small, New Haven engineering company.

After buying a home in Branford, Jean then took a position asa head trainer at Coldwell Banker; a position that ended when the company went from being a corporate entity to a franchise and discontinued the training center.

Jean then entered the retirement industry and became a marketing director for a local retirement community in Guilford. It was important to Jean that she always worked; always kept active and had new goals and ambitions. She had experience with the retirement industry, as it is uniquely tied to the real estate market. She worked at the community for four years until the company was sold to new management.

When she had been fresh from college, her gender had stood  in the way of her ambitions.  Men were not interested in hiring a woman, degree or not, for anything other than as a secretary. Now, in her mid-seventies, she found herself facing a new  type of discrimination.

Jean had sent out numerous resumes, looking for work in the marketing field, but there were no responses despite her many years of experience. “It didn’t take me long to figure out that it was my age.” Jean wasn’t going to take this ageism lying down, and if no one was going to hire her, she would start her own business, and so Senior Living Solutions was born. Armed with the idea of referring her clients who were selling their homes to a reliable real estate company,

Armed with the idea of referring her clients who were selling their homes to a reliable real estate company, Jean contacted the Pearce Company where she met Maureen Campbell, an executive and head of their relocationdepartment. Maureen saw the possibilities for a senior division and asked Jean if she would start a special program for seniors planning a move. That work lasted for 13 years, until last year when Maureen was offered the vice-presidency of Premier Transitions, a nation-wide relocation company that wanted to start a senior division. Maureen hired Jean as their Senior Consultant. Jean now helps individuals who are considering a move to a retirement community. In addition to helping families research communities, the Premier Transitions program callsin several outstanding local realtors, oversees the pricing and condition of the home to be sold and serves as a helpful resource for any other needed services such as antique dealers, estate sales professionals and downsizers. Best of all, in most instances, where a home sale is involved, there is no cost to the homeowner for this valuable advice and oversight.

Four years ago, Jean began to write a column for the New Haven Register. After she noticed that their previous columnist had moved to Arizona, Jean called their senior editor and convinced him that since seniors are the ones that still read newspapers, there should be someone who can be their voice and advocate.

In addition to her professional work, Jean volunteers for several organizations that are devoted to helping the growing senior population. She’s on the advisory board of the Agency on Aging, is an active member in the Shoreline Eldercare Alliance, the New Haven Area Senior Network and the Shoreline Senior Network. She hasserved on committees studying problems that affect the senior population and given classes on preparing for retirement for The Institute for Learning in Retirement. She has been recognized for her work with two awards; in 2014 with a “Woman of Fire Award” and this past October with the Shoreline Chambers of Commerce, “Women of Excellence” award.

Following the loss of her husband two years ago, she moved near the Branford Green. “I love it here. We have an awful lot on the Shoreline area. Museums in Hartford and New Haven, so much theater, Yale University; a variety of shops and restaurants along the water.

People talk about moving and retiring to places where taxes are less, but many places offer a lot less. If you haven’t lived elsewhere, you don’t realize what we have here”.

Looking back, Jean says she wouldn’t do anything differently. She’s always taken the chance whenever it was offered; realizing that windows of opportunity don’t last forever. “Whether it was making a cold call to the Register or walking into somebody’s office to present
an idea I believed in, I was never afraid to just take a chance on something”.

Throughout her years of life, Jean has learned that it is important for women who are in a position of power to offer other women a “hand up”. Jean may have done the work herself, but it was a woman taking a chance on another woman that got her a foot in the door. When women help other women, no glass ceiling can remain intact, for long.

Premier Transitions is headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee and partners with retirement communities to implement a full-service relocation program for their future residents.  The program includes everything from helping seniors to price their homes competitively to coordinating necessary resources such as decluttering, downsizing, donation, estate sale, and household goods move services.  Jean Cherni is the company’s Senior Consultant, operating out of their Connecticut office. To learn more about Premier, please contact us at 888-254-0005 or info@premiertransitions.com

Meritorious Service Award

Worldwide ERC® Meritorious Service Award Winners

Debbie Robinson Honored with Worldwide ERC® Meritorious Service Award

Debbie Robinson – Executive Vice President, Premier Transitions has earned a Meritorious Service Award from Worldwide ERC®, the workforce mobility association. The award will be announced at the Worldwide ERC® Americas Mobility Conference, 17-19 May in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

The Worldwide ERC® Service Recognition Awards Program was established in 1989 to honor members who voluntarily share their time, talent and expertise through various contributions to the association.  Members earn a Meritorious Service Award upon accumulating 10 service points.

Robinson earned the award for her individual contributions to the organization, including serving on the current Foundation Board of Worldwide ERC® , enjoying a fifteen year membership tenure and co-authoring several articles for Mobility Magazine.

Since 1964, Worldwide ERC® has been the voice, community and professional membership organization for workforce mobility professionals; growing in relevance, authority and integrity as its reach expands globally and across industries. Volunteer insight and participation play an integral role in the organization’s foundation of knowledge, its quality of networking and benchmarking, and pool of expertise. Worldwide ERC® is honored to congratulate and formally recognize its dedicated members for their contributions to its significant talent management role in the world’s workforce.

 

About Premier Transitions

Premier Transitions is a family owned, privately held relocation services company headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee with additional offices in North Haven, Connecticut and Charlotte, North Carolina. Our network of professional moving and real estate resources provides coast to coast capability for corporate clients and senior communities. A deeply held commitment to service, innovation and building lasting partnerships is our hallmark. We provide our clients and their employees trusted guidance in an inclusive environment, resulting in highly effective relocation solutions.

 About Worldwide ERC®
Since 1964, Worldwide ERC® has been committed to connecting and educating workforce mobility professionals across the globe. A global not-for-profit organization, Worldwide ERC® is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with offices in London and Shanghai, and is the source of global mobility knowledge and innovation in talent management from Europe, the Middle East and Africa, to Asia and across the Americas. For more information, visit www.WorldwideERC.org.

 

 

Women of Excellence Award

Premier Transitions is pleased to announce that Jean Cherni, its Senior Consultant, has received the Shoreline Connecticut Chamber of Commerce “Women of Excellence” Award.  Jean was selected from numerous highly qualified candidates.

This distinguished honor is awarded to outstanding women in the community who have excelled as role models, not only in their professional lives, but as leaders in their communities.  The five recipients, all from different walks of life, were judged on several common traits:

  • Driven work ethic
  • Strong sense of self- leading with inspiration
  • Role model for others
  • Commitment to community through volunteering

Among the dignitaries who presented or spoke at the awards luncheon and ceremony were: U.S. State Senator Richard Blumenthal, Connecticut State Senator Ted Kennedy, Jr., and Connecticut State Representative, Rosa DeLauro.

 

Premier Transitions is headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee and partners with retirement communities to implement a full-service relocation program for their future residents.  The program includes everything from helping seniors to price their homes competitively to coordinating necessary resources such as decluttering, downsizing, donation, estate sale, and household goods move services.  Jean Cherni is the company’s Senior Consultant, operating out of their Connecticut office.

 

The Value of the Written Word

 

IS THE HANDWRITTEN WORD DOOMED TO EXTINCTION?

SENIOR MOMENTS – By Jean Cherni  01/15/2017

Like me, I would guess that most of my readers were not aware that January is National Handwriting

Month. A recent publicity release from BIC pens in the interests of keeping handwriting alive,

informed me of this important date as well as their “Fight for Your Write” mission to promote the

 importance of teaching handwriting to kids in school and at home. While admittedly, Bic has an

invested interest in the continued use of the written word, many experts in early education and

psychology, also feel the gradual elimination of teaching handwriting skills in many schools, is a big

mistake. There is also a National Handwriting Association dedicated to preserving handwriting skills.

 Writing has a very long history, beginning as simple pictographs drawn on a rock; early

symbols were used to store information and to communicate it to others. Modern technology has

dramatically changed the way we communicate but despite the increased use of computers, the skill

of handwriting remains an important one. Seven states, California, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Utah,

Massachusetts and North Carolina fought to keep cursive in their curriculum when in 2013, the

Common Core educational standards dictated that cursive would no longer be taught in elementary

schools. Many educators and child psychologists feel that writing has the following positive effects:

  • Improves cognitive development and motor skills
  • Builds self-confidence
  • Improves reading skills ;when forming the letters, children learn the sound at the same time
  • Helps foster creativity and critical thinking skills

In addition, the student who has never studied cursive writing is often unable to do research in library

archives of important historical documents (like our Declaration of Independence) all written in the

cursive style. Many firms use the pseudo science of graphology which is the process of analyzing

handwriting to determine character traits, in their recruitment and it has even been used in some

court cases. There is, certainly, something beautiful in the personal distinctiveness of someone’s

handwriting; like one’s face, it is shared with no one else. I know that I still treasure some

handwritten letters that my father wrote to me; not only the sentiment they express but the

familiarity of his beautiful script, bring him close again as nothing else can. Sometime ago, in a letter

to the New York Times, a woman by the name of Susan Braiman eloquently expressed what many of

our generation feel when she said, “I feel sorry for any person who has never had the pleasure of

receiving a beautifully crafted or perhaps clumsily handwritten letter that reflects time, effort and the

personality of the writer. I am sorrier still, for the future generation that may never send or receive

that most private symbol of personal warmth and attachment.” Today, psychologists and social

workers are concerned about technology’s effect on our personal relationships.  We text rather than

take the time to make a personal call, we send 10 word messages to 30 Facebook “friends” rather

than listen attentively to just one. The importance of taking the time to send a caring note in our own

handwriting, should never be under estimated.

 

About Premier Transitions 

Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors. Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move. Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.

For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

ERC Distinguished Service Award

Maureen Campbell Honored with

Distinguished Service Award from Worldwide ERC®

 

Maureen Campbell, Senior Vice President of Premier Transitions has earned a Distinguished Service Award from Worldwide ERC®, the workforce mobility association. The award was announced at the Worldwide ERC® Spring Conference in Houston, Texas on May 19, 2016.

Since its inception in 1989, the Worldwide ERC® Service Recognition Awards Program has been honoring members who voluntarily share their time, talent and expertise through various contributions to the association.  Members earn a Distinguished Service Award upon accumulating 25 service points.

Campbell earned the award for her individual contributions to the organization, including her involvement in the 2015 Spring Conference Planning Committee, a two year commitment to the CRP Examination Committee, a seat on the U.S. Advisory Council, and participation in several Worldwide ERC Focus Groups.  Additionally, she has been a contributor to Mobility Magazine (“Relocation for the Ages”), and has served as a speaker at Worldwide ERC spring and fall conferences.  Campbell is one of only 443 members who have received the Distinguished Service Award since 1989.

Since 1964, Worldwide ERC® has been the forum for bringing workforce mobility professionals together, and our success is a direct result of our collaboration.  Worldwide ERC® is honored to congratulate and formally recognize those dedicated members for their contributions to that success.

About Premier Transitions:   Premier Transitions is a full-service relocation company assisting employers to facilitate job related moves for their employees.  Additionally, Premier Transitions offers a unique relocation program for seniors moving into retirement communities.  Premier works directly with independent living, assisted living, and continuing care communities to deliver a full-service program that facilitates downsizing, home preparation and sale, and household goods moves.  Corporate transferees and seniors are provided with a single point of contact from the beginning of their moves until they are successfully settled into their new location.

Premier Transitions is the newest member of Armstrong Relocation’s family of companies and is headquartered in Memphis, Tennessee.  Since its founding in 1922, Armstrong has been committed to providing a growing complement of relocation services that are recognizably superior by building trust, reducing stress and delivering reliability. For additional information, visit www.armstrongrelocation.com.

About Worldwide ERC®

Worldwide ERC® has served for over 50 years as the membership association and foremost center for corporate and government mobility, educating and connecting mobility professionals worldwide. The recognized industry authority on talent mobility and assignments in the U.S. and major global traffic areas, Worldwide ERC® is headquartered in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, with representation in Belgium and China. Contact Worldwide ERC® at +1 703 842 3400, or visit www.WorldwideERC.org.

 

To learn more about Premier Transitions, call 888-254-0005 or email info@PremierTransitions.com.   Visit our website at www.premiertransitions.com.

 

Keeping Pace with Technology

Jean Cherni: I’m beginning to wonder if some things are worth the trouble

I try hard to keep up, to stay abreast of what is happening. I really do!

I read the New York Times on a daily basis. The Week, an excellent weekly condensation of news from a variety of sources, arrives every Friday. And I tune in nightly to several different news channels on television. In addition, my work involves many committees and meetings with people considerably younger than myself.

But lately there have been several times when I have felt I am living in a foreign country, or perhaps on a strange planet.

I came across this question on my computer recently: “Can I use the Fitbit flex without the wireless sync dangle?” Not having the foggiest idea of whether either of these was animal, vegetable or mineral, I did some research and found that Fitbit is a popular new device that looks like a watch and keeps track of pulse and heart rate, your workout summaries, sleep tracking, all-day activities, number of steps taken, floors climbed, active minutes and calories burned.

Further research revealed the wireless Fitbit dangle was not a new species of bat, but a small USB (a popular connection used to connect a computer to devices such as a digital camera or printer) that allows the Fitbit device to synchronize its data onto a computer and upload the info to your Fitbit website.

While I know exercise is good for everyone — and we all should probably get more than we do — keeping track of how many steps climbed or how many hours of deep sleep we get a night seems like a lot of unnecessary and almost obsessive trouble. For the legions of us trying to lose weight, I found that there are also many new devices and websites offering help.

There is, for instance, the gram-o-meter, the Fat Secret (couldn’t they have come up with a better name than that?) and My Fitness Pal, which features a message board where subscribers offer advice to one another on topics like overcoming binge eating. Membership to the site is free, but, of course, there is also a “Shop” area offering all kinds of exercise and weight-loss accessories.

My Fitness Pal has the most comprehensive list of the exact number of calories and chemical content of most popular brands of food. After figuring all of the ingredients of every bite of food involved in a typical meal, not only do I have a headache, forget ever enjoying food again.

There must be a less compulsive way to sensible eating. One of the newest technological advances which I haven’t tried is virtual reality; a device that through the use of goggles or a headset imprisons us in a programing experience that will have major positive and negative effects.

According to a New York Times report, “you are swaddled in goggles and headphones with the result that your power-forward senses (sight and hearing) are steamrolled by a visually and orally complete universe that seals out opportunity for doubt.” While the proposed medical and research uses for virtual reality are exciting, the possible misuse is indeed scary.

For every new invention, from the steam engine to the telephone and the automobile to the computer, we pay a price in a lost way of life.

Occasionally, looking back, we realize perhaps it wasn’t worth it.

Contact Jean Cherni, senior adviser for Premier Transitions, a full-service program for seniors contemplating a move, at jeancherni@sbcglobal.net or 49 Rose St., Apt. 510, Branford, 06405.

About Premier Transitions Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors. Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move. Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.
For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

Baby Boomers: Home Is Where The Heart Is

Baby Boomers: Home Is Where The Heart Is

Within the next five years, Baby Boomers are projected to have the largest household growth of any other generation during that same time period, according to the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard. Let’s take a look at why…

In Merrill Lynch’s latest study, “Home in Retirement: More Freedom, New Choices” they surveyed nearly 6,000 adults ages 21 and older about housing.

Crossing the “Freedom Threshold”

Throughout our lives, there are often responsibilities that dictate where we live. Whether being in the best school district for our children, being close to our jobs, or some other factor is preventing a move, the study found that there is a substantial shift that takes place at age 61.

The study refers to this change as “Crossing the Freedom Threshold”. When where you live is no longer determined by responsibilities, but rather a freedom to live wherever you like. (see the chart below)

Crossing The "Freedom Threshold" | Keeping Current Matters

As one participant in the study stated:

“In retirement, you have the chance to live anywhere you want. Or you can just stay where you are. There hasn’t been another time in life when we’ve had that kind of freedom.” 

On the Move

According to the study, “an estimated 4.2 million retirees moved into a new home last year alone.” Two-thirds of retirees say that they are likely to move at least once during retirement.

The top reason to relocate cited was “wanting to be closer to family” at 29%, a close second was “wanting to reduce home expenses”. See the chart below for the top 6 reasons broken down.

Reasons for Moving in Retirement | Keeping Current Matters

Not Every Baby Boomer Downsizes

There is a common misconception that as retirees find themselves with less children at home that they will instantly desire a smaller home to maintain. While that may be the case for half of those surveyed, the study found that three in ten decide to actually upsize to a larger home.

Some choose to buy a home in a desirable destination with extra space for large family vacations, reunions, extended visits, or to allow other family members to move in with them.

“Retirees often find their homes become places for family to come together and reconnect, particularly during holidays or summer vacations.”

Bottom Line

If your housing needs have changed or are about to change, meet with a local real estate professional in your area who can help with deciding your next step.

 

About Premier Transitions 

Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors. Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move. Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.

For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

Springtime is Downsizing Season

No matter where you or a loved one are on the downsizing journey – or “rightsizing” as it’s becoming known – a little at a time goes a LONG way! 

Repeat after me… It’s never too early to start planning! The first step? Consider where you are now and where you might like to be. Maybe moving from a 3 or 4-bedroom home to a smaller single family home, apartment, condo, assisted living or independent living – in the next few months or even three years from now.

WHAT STUFF WILL I NEED?

Envision your new, simpler lifestyle and space. Fewer bedrooms and bathrooms equals fewer sheets, blankets, towels and other linens. You may no longer need that treadmill and workout gear if your new apartment complex has an exercise room. Will meals be provided where you’re moving? Pare down kitchenware, appliances and entertaining items. Is lawn and landscape care included? Think about your mower, gardening tools and other household maintenance equipment. Retiring soon? Perhaps you’ll want more casual clothes and can pass along the business attire. You get the idea!

MAKING DECISIONS ABOUT YOUR STUFF

Make a plan to go through your belongings – once a week, twice a week or once a month? Put it on your calendar just like an appointment. You can start small (a drawer) or big (an attic). The most important thing is to start somewhere! Work in segments of a few hours or less. Going through years’ worth of memories and items can be physically and emotionally tiring.

Divide things into categories: SELL, DONATE, TRASH or GOES SOMEWHERE ELSE. You’ll want boxes, laundry baskets or plastic totes for this job. It’s to your benefit to make reasonable decisions. Seriously ask yourself if you truly LOVE it or NEED it. Keep your goal in mind of moving to a smaller space and simpler lifestyle!

Couple_movingboxes
Haven’t used that extra set of dishes in the past year – someone else would be thrilled to have them! 

WHAT TO DO WITH WANT YOU DON’T WANT

Lots of options – even a combination of these can help:

  • Donation: Any number of local charities would LOVE your cast-offs. Find one that offers pick-up or a convenient drop-off location. If needed, ask for a donation receipt.
  • Sell: Online sites like VarageSale or a community resale Facebook group. A garage or estate sale – then have a plan for anything that’s leftover. Consignment is ideal for women’s clothing and accessories, plus furniture and home decor.
  • Re-gift: Has someone admired a particular item? Ask if they might like it!
  • Trash: If it’s broken beyond repair or completely worn out, go ahead and trash or recycle. Many items can go in the regular trash pick-up, just ask your provider.

STAY ENCOURAGED

Our homes encompass a lifetime of treasures and memories. Find ways to honor the attachment to an item, then pass it along if you don’t love or use it. It will feel so good to make these decisions, a little along the way!

For more information about downsizing your stuff, visit http://www.stayorganizedwithus.com. Another great resource is the AARP book, Downsizing The Family Home: What to Save, What to Let Go, by Marni Jameson.

About Premier Transitions 

Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors. Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move. Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.

For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

‘Oldest Daughters’ Helping Seniors

Premier couldn’t help but feel a connection to the Senior Housing News (SHN) article published earlier this month featuring a life plan community who employs move-in coordinators at their locations in Illinois and Arizona. Senior Housing News (SHN) is the leading source for news and information covering the senior housing industry. The article shares the story of these professionals who fulfill the role of the oldest daughter in a family, often the one who takes charge of helping their parents move to a new community.  Premier’s Senior Consultants also assume the role of the ‘Oldest Daughter’ when supporting our senior clients through their transition into community living. We research and screen the local resources necessary to facilitate the move, coordinate appointments, follow-up on the promises made by real estate agents, professional downsizers and the van line. We oversee and manage every aspect of the transition with the goal of easing the stress and strain that any move can bring. We embrace our role as the ‘Oldest Daughter’ many seniors wish they had to help them and invite you to enjoy the following article.

 

Provider Takes on ‘Oldest Daughter’ Duties to Drive Move-Ins

January 4, 2016 by Mary Kate Nelson

Coordinating a move into senior housing and all that goes with it—the downsizing, the movers, the emotions, the realtors—is a burden that typically falls on a prospective resident’s oldest adult daughter. But what if the burden were removed from her shoulders?

One senior housing provider clued Senior Housing News into how it is, in a sense, providing a stand-in oldest adult daughter for its new residents, and why doing so may give it a competitive edge.

A Stress-Free Transition

Mather LifeWays, which operates an independent living community in Wilmette, Illinois, and life plan communities (formerly known as CCRCs) in Evanston, Illinois, and Tucson, Arizona, employs a move-in coordinator at each of its locations who essentially fills the role of future residents’ “oldest adult daughter.”

“Oldest adult daughters typically love the service,” Gale Morgan, Mather LifeWays’ vice president of sales, told Senior Housing News. Mather LifeWays has reasons to love it as well.

Often, the actual move from a long-time home into a senior living community is what keeps prospective residents from making the choice to go forward, according to Morgan. The idea of where to begin can be overwhelming for the senior and the loved one who has been charged with arranging the transition.

That’s where the Mather’s move-in coordinators come in. As soon as a future resident makes a deposit, the coordinator begins making the moving process “as manageable and stress-free for the depositor as possible,” Morgan said.

Morgan explained that the top challenge when it comes to moving revolves around what exactly the residents can bring with them to their new homes. Consequently, Mather’s move-in coordinators visit each depositor’s home to get a sense of his or her belongings and help make downsizing decisions, if necessary. Perhaps a certain sofa will not fit in the new apartment, or they have to choose one of three coffee tables to bring along.

The move-in coordinator also consults a space planner and an interior designer to guarantee that the items future residents want to bring with them will fit. Then, they plan the new space, all the way down to what artwork goes where.

Marisela Panzarella, the move-in coordinator at Mather Lifeways’ Splendido at Rancho Vistoso life plan community in Tucson, doubles as an interior designer.

Move-in coordinators also work to ensure that a space plan is hung in the entryway of residents’ new homes so the moving company knows where every single piece of furniture should be placed.

Some other services the move-in coordinator takes care of? They can set depositors up with recommended realtors and moving companies, and home staging services are provided free of charge to depositors to help sell their homes quickly and efficiently.

On move-in day, it’s the move-in coordinator’s job to meet new residents at the door of the community while Mather’s building services works with the movers.

A new resident is then shown to his or her new apartment, which is outfitted with a huge red bow on the door and a red carpet laid out in the hallway preceding it.

“We make it positive because they just left their home, which maybe was their home of 30 years,” Morgan told SHN. “There’s a lot of emotions that go with that.”

Prior to this moment, the move-in coordinator will have gathered some personal details about the new resident, such as favorite snacks and types of flowers. That way, when new residents arrive at the new apartment, their favorite foods will be waiting for them in the fridge and their favorite song will be playing.

“We make sure that home is ready for them,” Morgan explained. “Home is your favorite things.”

On top of that, the move-in coordinator has made sure the new apartment has “all of the necessities” that can be overlooked during a busy time—paper towels, toilet tissue, a pad of paper and a pen. There is also a temporary phone service available and some folding chairs ready to use while the furniture is being moved in.

A Value Proposition

According to Morgan, the decision to offer these services to Mather LifeWays depositors is, in part, a value proposition.

“We have a relatively high-end customer,” Morgan explained.

The process the move-in coordinator goes through also leads to depositors’ homes selling more quickly, and residents moving into Mather LifeWays properties faster, she said.

“We simply have learned that it benefits everyone to make this process as easy as possible,” Morgan said. “The residents arrive happier, they settle in faster, they settle into the community and their resident satisfaction is higher.”

Written by Mary Kate Nelson

 

About Premier Transitions 

Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors. Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move. Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.

For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

 

 

Moving in the U.S. – What state would you pick?

United National Movers Study  –

 

If you were going to move anywhere in the U.S., what state would you pick?  For the 39th year, United Van Lines conducted a migration study of our customers to see where they wanted to go.  

 

Jan 1, 2016 –

For the third consecutive year, Oregon holds on to the No. 1 spot as “Top Moving Destination,” as Americans continue to pack up and head West and South. Those are the results of United Van Lines’ 39th Annual National Movers Study, which tracks customers’ state-to-state migration patterns over the past year.

Oregon is the most popular moving destination of 2015 with 69 percent of moves to and from the state being inbound. The state has continued to climb the ranks, increasing inbound migration by 10 percent over the past six years. New to the 2015 top inbound list is another Pacific West state,Washington, which came in at No. 10 with 56 percent inbound moves.

The Southern states also saw a high number of people moving in with 53 percent of total moves being inbound. In a separate survey of its customers, United Van Lines found the top reasons for moving South included company transfer/new job, retirement and proximity to family.

The Northeast continues to experience a moving deficit with New Jersey (67 percent outbound) and New York (65 percent) making the list of top outbound states for the fourth consecutive year. Two other states in the region — Connecticut (63 percent) and Massachusetts (57 percent) — also joined the top outbound list this year. The exception to this trend is Vermont (62 percent inbound), which moved up two spots on the list of top inbound states to No. 3.

“For nearly 40 years, we’ve been tracking which states people are moving to and from, and we’ve also recently started surveying our customers to understand why they are making these moves across state lines,” said Melissa Sullivan, director of marketing communications at United Van Lines. “Because of United Van Lines’ position as the nation’s largest household goods mover, our data is reflective of national migration trends.”

“This year’s data reflects longer-term trends of people moving to the Pacific West, where cities such as Portland and Seattle are seeing the combination of a boom in the technology and creative marketing industry, as well as a growing ‘want’ for outdoor activity and green space,” said Michael Stoll, economist, professor and chair of the Department of Public Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles. “The aging Boomer population is driving relocation from the Northeast and Midwest to the West and South, as more and more people retire to warmer regions.”

United has tracked migration patterns annually on a state-by-state basis since 1977. For 2015, the study is based on household moves handled by United within the 48 contiguous states and Washington, D.C. United classifies states as “high inbound” if 55 percent or more of the moves are going into a state, “high outbound” if 55 percent or more moves were coming out of a state or “balanced” if the difference between inbound and outbound is negligible.

Moving In

The top inbound states of 2015 were:

  1. Oregon
  2. South Carolina
  3. Vermont
  4. Idaho
  5. North Carolina
  6. Florida
  7. Nevada
  8. District of Columbia
  9. Texas
  10. Washington

 

The Western U.S. is represented on the high-inbound list by Oregon (69 percent), Nevada (57 percent) and Washington (56 percent). Of moves to Oregon, a new job or company transfer (53 percent) and wanting to be closer to family (20 percent) led the reasons for most inbound moves. Nevada remained on the high inbound list for the fifth consecutive year.

Moving Out

The top outbound states for 2015 were:

  1. New Jersey
  2. New York
  3. Illinois
  4. Connecticut
  5. Ohio
  6. Kansas
  7. Massachusetts
  8. West Virginia
  9. Mississippi
  10. Maryland

 

In addition to theNortheast, Illinois (63 percent) held steady at the No. 3 spot, ranking in the top five for the last seven years.

New additions to the 2014 top outbound list include Connecticut (63 percent), Massachusetts(57 percent) and Mississippi (56 percent).

Balanced

Several states gained approximately the same number of residents as those that left. This list of “balanced” states includes Alabama, North Dakota, Delaware and Louisiana.

Please click on the following link to download the entire study.

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About United Van Lines

United Van Lines is America’s #1 Mover®, offering a full range of moving solutions from do-it-yourself to full-service. With headquarters in suburban St. Louis, United Van Lines maintains a network of 400 affiliated agencies. For more information about United Van Lines visit UnitedVanLines.com.

Editor’s note: Attached, for your reference, is a map showing migration trends for each state. If you are interested in specific information for your area, please contact Melissa Sullivan atmelissa_sullivan@unigroup.com.

 

About Premier Transitions 

Premier Transitions is part of the family of companies within Armstrong Relocation, a United Van Lines Agent.  Premier offers a full-service relocation program for seniors.  Every client has a personal Senior Consultant who provides professional guidance, real estate expertise, oversight of necessary resources, and management of every aspect of the move.  Retirement communities benefit from the expedition of the decision-making and home sale process. Our continuous feedback loop ensures that communities are fully informed on every detail of their depositor’s move, enabling the sales team to focus on the next client.

For more information about Premier, visit www.premiertransitions.com or contact us at Info@PremierTransitions.com

 

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